PerksOfAWallflower

language nerds !!!!

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Hi Cynthia Smiler

As you said language is a very tricky medium of expression. Maybe that is the reason some people sing? Personally, the best way of self-expression for me is dancing.

Now back to the language issue. As Regina, I was born in Moscow. When the iron curtain fell we left for Israel. I cannot believe Regina is performing in Tel-Aviv today and I am not there! Now I live in New York - do not know for how long yet. The bottom line is that I prefer to read in Russian, speak in Hebrew, and write in English - different language for every means of communication Wink I know I am weird - but that is life. I did not choose it, it just happened and all I can do is adjust and learn the languages. At some point I even studied a little bit of French linguistics and I loved it. I think that the best way to acquire a new language is linguistic courses - structural analysis really helps with getting the grammar.

Your English is great, but you migh also consider posting in Portuguese (with some translation) so more people could participate in this forum.

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quote:
Your English is great, but you migh also consider posting in Portuguese (with some translation) so more people could participate in this forum.

First of all: Thank you!

Second of all: I'd love to post in portuguese, but there are only 2 portuguese speakers here, me and "Dourado", so it's not really necessary. But if more of us joins this board (and I believe it'll happen, especially with brazilians, we are worse than ants, we are EVERYWHERE), I'll be more than happy to discuss Regina in my own language here. Smiler

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ahhh...these replys excite me....i have so many questions!

first order of buisness. marry ann. i had a question about judism, there arent as many jewish families where i live. I know that jewish children go to hebrew school and they must read from the torah for their bat/barmitzvahs. but do most american/ anywhere but israel jewish kids continue to learn hebrew and speak it fluenty??? (

and Oui, je veux practicer mon francais avec vous. Mais mon francaise est tres mauvais... haha

second order... for those of you who learned a language later in life and often practice it fluently do you ever have thoughs in this language? i know people who grew up bilangually who think in both languages but i wonder about second languages?

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I'm from the Netherlands (living there still) so my first Language is Dutch. In the Netherlands at least one second language is compulsory at most schools so I learned English as second language when I was 10 years old or so. Whenever I had a school assignment for English I at least tried tried to think in the other language and I must say that nowadays I frequently think in English (just out of the blue)... maybe it's all those English records I hear and Shakespeare stuff I read Wink. Needless to say, I had high marks in most language classes and feel I can speak and write English without much problems.

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for those of you who learned a language later in life and often practice it fluently do you ever have thoughs in this language? i know people who grew up bilangually who think in both languages but i wonder about second languages?

Well, it depends on the subject. I know it may sound strange, but if I'm thinking about a suject that I usually discuss in English - such as music, movies and TV shows - I'll think in English. If the subject is soccer or any other subject I usually discuss in "real life" - such as... well, pretty much everything -, I'll think in Portuguese.

My favorite subject in college so far was Psycholinguistics. I really recommend it to anyone who's fascinated by how humans acquire, use, and understand language. It's one of the most interesting things I have ever studied. Unfortunately, I only had a brief presentantion of the subject, but I'll certainly take the whole course really soon.

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Dear PerksOfAWallflower:

I totally agree with Cynthia - it depends on the matter discussed. I think about some things in English and some things in Russian, others in Hebrew. It depends in which language you learned it or in which language you discuss it more often. I know people who study in the US but are not English native speakers - whenever they talk about their studies, they switch to English. Funny Smiler

I disagree with your friend Yanna though. Russian does not have more depth than English - it is just very different. It is hard to translate Russian/English because these languages express highly different mentalities - it is more a cultural difficulty than a linguistic one. Both languages are very rich and colourful.

As far a Judaism goes, it is a harder question. It depends. In America most Jewish kids learn Hebrew for the Bar/Bat - Mitzva. In other countries many kids learn Hebrew without any connection to religion and in some people still talk Yiddish or Ladino at home. Unfortunately, I am not an expert. I think the chances are that if you meet somebody who speaks Hebrew he is whether religious or Israely.

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Well, there's one mamal who has the same vocal range as humans: the gelada baboon, which is quite funny... they don't have words as we know them but are actually the only monkey who communicate EVERYTHING with their 'voice' instead of just the territorial and mating stuff. There's a real sense of talking with these creatures even chimps don't have...

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quote:
I disagree with your friend Yanna though. Russian does not have more depth than English - it is just very different. It is hard to translate Russian/English because these languages express highly different mentalities - it is more a cultural difficulty than a linguistic one. Both languages are very rich and colourful.

Perfect! Couldn't have said it better.

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Do some here also speak a dialect? In the Netherlands there's a great variety of different dialects, about 10 dialects in a country hardly the size of the smallest US state... Dutch is the common language composed of those dialects from various regions (for all regions in the kingdom to have a common language). Oh and there's Frisian (northern Netherlands) which has been spoken even before the time of the ancient Romans! Any Frisian speakers too?

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Haha, language nerds, I like this forum. When I lived in Sicily I learned and spoke Sicilianu and Italian. Sicilianu is somewhat of a dialect, but it really is its own language due to its many influences. It has combinations of Greek, Latin, Arabic, French, Spanish, Catalan, and even a little German. My uncles there weren't very educated so growing up around them I spoke a very slang derivative of both languages. I have friends in Central and Northern Italy and we usually speak in English because our different uses of the language can even get confusing.

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