PerksOfAWallflower

language nerds !!!!

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I think I know exactly what you mean, and the Finnish equivalent is "myötähäpeä", but dictionary doesn't have an english term for it. Sorry! Guess you'll just have to use "to be ashamed for" or "to be ashamed on behalf of". Those were the closest hits I got, but as I'm not a native speaker, don't believe me!

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as far as i know there isn't one. actually i never even thought about the difference to be honest. in english i think the word can go both ways, being embarrassed for something you've done or something someone else has done. just last week i brought a friend to bible study, where she managed to say many curse words which embarassed me because i had brought her there.

the dictionary says : To cause to feel self-conscious or ill at ease. i think this definition is good because it applys to both parts.

i love how in different languages we often do that. one language will have a very specific word that another language does not, even though there is a sense of what that word means.

i hear that in spanish there is a verb for when one puts on an article of clothing for the very first time. isn't that amazing! those things can really show cultural differences between languages too. ah, language...my solitude.

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quote:
Originally posted by kandi:

i wish english had an il faut, and that "one" was more commonly used and accepted as a pronoun.

gosh, haha. i've started using one all the time, its kind of ridiculous. i think its stupid to use "you" when you're not really talking to one person, but rather everyone.

haha, wouldn't it be funny if people went around saying "it is necessary that you are nice to waiters"... "it is necessary that people do their part"... oh gosh. lets do it!

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i don't like "it is necessary" in place of il faut though.

let's make our own verb! or better yet, a verb that has no infinitive and cannot be used with any other pronoun than "one" (or "it" would be more parallel with french, non?)

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thanks Perks, very cool! the way you explain it, the absence of an adjective (should have said that!) or even another word for feeling embarrassed because of someone else makes sense. "plaatsvervangende" is a dutch verb (plaatsvervangen: to replace) turned into an adjective.

Il faut... I know that one, or, well, I starkly remember an exact sentence from my high school french book which used it: "Il faut travailler! le president il arrives(?) á notre village çette matin!"

I recall it meant "one should get to work the President is coming to the village this afternoon!"

Dutch for certainty: "men moet aan het werk! de President komt vanmiddag in ons dorp!"

it was what madame Soussison (grocery store-keep Razzer) said to the gathered townspeople of st. Jean-Pierre-les-trois-pompes after hearing of the impending visit of the President of France to st. Jean-Pierre-les-trois-pompes.*

oof, my written French is rusty! I should polish it when I have the time. tricky one too, il faut, not an easy answer... one should.

Back to "il faut", yes, certainly, maybe some stixers noticed, I use "one" as pronoun quite often... maybe because in Dutch there is the pronoun "men" which is used in a similar way and indeed commonly used and accepted.

*(and in the end, the silly "maire" of the town had unwittingly opened a letter to st. jean-pierre-les-deux-pompes! Hilarity ensues :P)

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haha we're doing subjunctive in (french) class now, and i've always wanted an "il faut"! it makes little sense when translated literally (or, not little sense, but it's strange to hear), but it is so useful! i think this is buried deeper in the thread, but "it is necessary" just sounds informal and weird. same with "one." "it is necessary that one bathes." lol!

and i was reading in my brit lit book last year about modern english, and it said that "y'all" was a good equivilant of "vous," a plural "you". while that makes sense, i am not about to start saying "y'all".

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i went on vacation to NC this summer, and the people we met down there kept trying to get us to say "y'all" and "soda". haha apparently not many people say "pop" but that's the only thing i can call it! "soda" sounds sort of old-fashioned to my ears.

isn't it weird how there are certain words that are only used in certain regions of the country? boggles my mind.

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