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BitsOfBone

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quote:
Originally posted by Brenna:

i wish my teacher was like that... god she wouldn't even let us read TO KILL A FREAKING MOCKINGBIRD because it says the n-word. !!!!!!

i was so pissed off

Are you kidding me? My teacher assigned To Kill A Mockingbird to us in 8th grade. That is ridiculous.

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quote:
Originally posted by Ezra Pound:

quote:
Originally posted by Brenna:

i wish my teacher was like that... god she wouldn't even let us read TO KILL A FREAKING MOCKINGBIRD because it says the n-word. !!!!!!

i was so pissed off

Are you kidding me? My teacher assigned To Kill A Mockingbird to us in 8th grade. That is ridiculous.

Wow... yeah. We read that in ninth grade. And as much as I hate people using the n-word in a negative way, I don't see why it's a problem in historical literature... We read a play called "Fences" by August Wilson in AP English last year, and that was 10 times worse than "To Kill a Mockingbird." But I can see why some people are afraid to use it at all. It's very offensive in most contexts...

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yea.. we read 'to kill a mockingbird' in 9th grade, and had to say "n-word" instead of the real word while reading aloud. but..who cares it was a great book! and we also read 'the color purple'.. which has so much sexual content in it.... and it was really funny hearing the teacher read aloud!!!!!!! hahaha. laughed my ass off i tell ya!

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Anything by

Gabriel Garcia Marquez--Love in the time of cholera, No one writes to the colonel, and of course One Hundred Years of Solitude

William Faulkner--my favorite is The Sound and the Fury

Albert Camus--The Stranger (though this one has already been recommended)

others--Rosencrantz and Guildernstern are Dead, The Kingdom of this World (Alejo Carpentier), Heart of Darkness, and lots and lots of history books that probably some of you wouldn't find to be that interesting to read. that is it for now

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quote:
i wish my teacher was like that... god she wouldn't even let us read TO KILL A FREAKING MOCKINGBIRD because it says the n-word. !!!!!!

i was so pissed off

You have got to freakin' kidding me...

We didn't read it in school, but my Religous Studies teacher showed us the movie.

Two amazing things happened after I saw that movie... 1) I fell in love with Gregory Peck, 2) I went out and bought the book.

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My sister loves old movies, and she knows all about all these old actors I've never even heard of...she's all up in it and everything...and she loves the movie version and Gregory Peck. At the end of my 7th grade school year, I found a copy of To Kill a Mockingbird in my backpack, all mysterious and everything, as if someone had just accidentally dropped it in there, and so one night I started to read it but my mom caught me and got all mad and took it away. And I haven't gotten around to reading it ever since then. Frowner Even though I want to. My mom shelters me way too much. She's still in denial that I know how babies are made. Roll Eyes

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hehe... I remember when I was little, my mom wouldn't let me read any "mature" books (evidently mature is code for good) so I would have to sneak around with them, and not let her find me reading them. I find it so funny because most kids my age were hiding, like, dirty magazines and stuff. Whereas I was hiding my Jane Austen books, and feeling extremely rebellious about it.

ah, the good days Smiler

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talked about "spilling open: the art of becoming yourself" by sabrina ward harrison, in detail here in my last post.

i know it sounds really cheesey, but i recommend it for every girl. it is so eye opening to societal pressures and finding how to deal, and it has some GReAT art in there!

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Kali mac, I also read Empress of the World, it was the first book I ever read dealing with Lesbianism, that was in 7th grade, when I was just realizing my sexuality. I've recently re-read it (actually, about a week ago), and now my ex-girlfriend, whom is now one of my very best friends, is reading it! Keeping you a Secret by Julie Anne Peters is also good, as well as Annie On My Mind, the author slips my mind.

I haven't read Hard Love, though, I'll have to look that up.

I'm not out, though.

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