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UnicyclePoet

Profanity/Vulgarity

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quote:
Originally posted by almostspotless:

I don't really know how much I want to jump in here.

But... I think I see what both of you are saying. BLtWP, I see your point. And I understand that cursing may be unpleasant to the ears of some. But honestly? Words are just sounds. Sounds, that might be used a certain way, and be considered offensive, and might be used another way, and not be so offensive. It's very... abstract. Language. How it evolves, how it grows and changes into a sort of taboo.

On the one hand, I have very little respect for someone who drops an f-bomb in between every other word. Because these words have gravity, and there's a time and a place for them.

But on the other hand, a well placed curse word, because of this gravity it possesses, can have enormous effect on literature, or a song, or whatnot. There are times when a word that holds so much should be dropped, along with all that it carries.

edit: And if people use ugly words fluently, then why are they ugly? Words are words are words are words. Whichever way you may perceive them.

thanks-and i agree that there's a time and place for words like those. i just hate to see that people are becoming more comfortable with putting them in places that sensitive people can't avoid. it's annoying. And growing up in this culture, it's perfectly sound to assume that everyone is desensitized to these words. But is that what we want? 11-year-olds who curse for no good reason? because i really don't see any words being viewed as off-limits any more. the f-bomb is sneaking into PG-13 movies. 13? I understand that most kids (especially those who attend a school, rather than being homeschooled) have at least heard this word by that age. But i just don't understand the push in the media to get these words out there. They'll lose their gravity (good word, btw, almostspotless), and then they'll mean nothing. I doubt that any words are on their way to becoming the new generation of curses, and so "strong language" will become a thing of the past.

in keeping with personal responsibility/choice, i think the bottom line is, speak how you want in private-whether that's yelling the f-bomb in your house, or just saying it in conversation-but don't throw it out there at others you don't know well, or loudly enough for them to hear. This sounds like civilized common sense, but i know a l.o.t. of people who freely throw around every word on "the list" with people who are closer to being strangers than acquaintences!

i still don't see a necessity to having these words in our language, to be honest. if you want to express something strongly, then get a little more creative than tagging on a "bad" word.

i guess in a way, the exposure of this harsh language is good, because it'll let us lose that easy out of cursing, and force us to be a little more articulate.

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quote:
Originally posted by Ezra Pound:

quote:
Originally posted by Be like the water, people.:

but could someone enlighten me on this? i'm genuinely asking-why does sweet Regina Spektor feel the need to drop the F-bomb when she cuts her finger, yet insist that we shouldn't allow guns to citizens? are people not aware that it's words like those that cause hurt/angry feelings, even some of the time? or is it okay for people to be angry, offended, hurt, and wounded, as long as they don't have a legal right to shoot you for it?

The whole thing is that swearing doesn't kill anyone. Guns do. I've never heard of anyone dying from exposure to vulgar language but I have heard of plenty of people getting killed by guns.

^^ Very well said and great point.

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In my opinion, cursing is a much healthier way of releasing your anger than ways that might involve a gun... but maybe that's just me.

Besides, swearing is not inherently about hurting and angering people. In fact, my generation uses it as humor more than anything else. For me it's just a way to put emphasis on something. And it's not like the f-bomb is attacking any sort of cultural ethnicity or gender or orientation... those words are a bit different. But even those words are being reclaimed by the ancestors of those who were oppressed, like the N-word, or the C-word. Which I think is pretty badass, especially considering the historical and domestic significance of both. I feel a similar way about "fuck" (even though it does, to a large degree, lack the history of opression that those other words have). Maybe a generation ago it was an ugly ugly word, but it's not anymore, not to the same degree anyway. In my opinion, it's been reclaimed by our generation. Languages change all the time...

I wonder sometimes, what will be the offensive words for this generation. Smiler

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You can't completely protect a child from profanity and/or vulgarity. Even if you only allow them to watch G-rated movies the kid that sits next to them in science class might still say "fuck" in the playground or the girl in the other class might still talk about hearing her brother and his girlfriend having sex.

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