Sign in to follow this  
almostspotless

The Floor Heard Everything

Recommended Posts

I am officially addicted to this song. It's insane how she's able to communicate such a clear story using so few words.

Father, father, father, father, father,

father, father, father

Yes

Father, father, father, father, father,

father, father, father

Yes

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

Yes

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

The floor's favorite feet are bare

The soldiers came in their boots

Civilians came in their shoes

The nurses came in their heels

The children came in their hoops

But the floor's favorite feet are bare

The floor's favorite feet are bare

Father, father, father, father, father,

father, father, father

Yes

Forgiveness, forgiveness, forgiveness, forgiveness,

forgiveness, forgiveness, forgiveness,

Father, father, father, father, father,

father, father, father

Yes

Forgiveness, forgiveness, forgiveness

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

Yes

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

The floor's favorite feet are bare

The soldiers came in their boots

Civilians came in their shoes

The nurses came in their heels

The children came in their hoops

But the floor's favorite feet are bare

The floor's favorite feet are bare

The floor's favorite feet are bare

To me, this song is about domestic abuse. "The floor heard everything," "father father father," and then the part about forgiveness. And I feel really strongly about that, which leads me to even more wonderment at the sheer genius of this song. It's able to evoke such a complete scene for me, and with so few words.

I haven't really thought about it beyond that though. Any thoughts, all you brilliant song interpreters out there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am officially addicted to this song. It's insane how she's able to communicate such a clear story using so few words.

Father, father, father, father, father,

father, father, father

Yes

Father, father, father, father, father,

father, father, father

Yes

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

Yes

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

The floor's favorite feet are bare

The soldiers came in their boots

Civilians came in their shoes

The nurses came in their heels

The children came in their hoops

But the floor's favorite feet are bare

The floor's favorite feet are bare

Father, father, father, father, father,

father, father, father

Yes

Forgiveness, forgiveness, forgiveness, forgiveness,

forgiveness, forgiveness, forgiveness,

Father, father, father, father, father,

father, father, father

Yes

Forgiveness, forgiveness, forgiveness

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

Yes

The floor heard everything

The floor heard everything

The floor's favorite feet are bare

The soldiers came in their boots

Civilians came in their shoes

The nurses came in their heels

The children came in their hoops

But the floor's favorite feet are bare

The floor's favorite feet are bare

The floor's favorite feet are bare

To me, this song is about domestic abuse. "The floor heard everything," "father father father," and then the part about forgiveness. And I feel really strongly about that, which leads me to even more wonderment at the sheer genius of this song. It's able to evoke such a complete scene for me, and with so few words.

I haven't really thought about it beyond that though. Any thoughts, all you brilliant song interpreters out there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your ideas about the song really make sense... She certainly does paint a vivid picture with such few words. The line "the floor heard everything" really speaks to the way nothing can truly be kept secret.

Oh and I thought the line was "the children came in their hooves..." Which I took as a humorous take on the cluelessness of kids. (They're just stomping around in an emotional situation or something like that. Idk...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this song is darned catchy!

i automatically took it to be about the bedroom, mostly because i thought father could be taken sexually, and the yes is pretty obvious in context, as well as the nurses.. and in keeping with that, i figured the couple was just kinky and acted things out about civilians and soldiers (coming home from the war and all that). then the kids' "hooves" were them clomping in and jumping into mommy and daddy's bed during the day or whatever, totally oblivious.

Then, the floor's favorite feet are bare would refer to the couple being intimate without gimmicks... though i'm at a loss about who the floor represents-i'd say it was just a fly-on-the-wall perspective for the sake of communicating the song, but the floor has a preferrence about feet (feet representing the differnt ways the master bedroom is used). so i don't know what the true significance of the floor is...

But i love your interpretation! it's more rich than mine, and it puts the "forgiveness" into perspective. there are some blanks that i can't seem to fill, though: Nurses, if the ambulance was called in from the abuse, but soldiers? civilians? and why exactly does she repeat "father" so many times?

i feel like i'm missing something obvious. Frowner

oh, and why are the floor's favorite feet bare? What's with all the "yes"'s? perhaps a double-entendre?

nitpick: i think it's "the nurses came in high heels" but i'm not positive.

P.S. i can't get this song out of my head!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me. I think this song is about church/confession. (note- i'm atheist so why i think this...idk). The 'Father' part, is like praying fervently. kind of like those fancy churches where people rock to and fro and shout things like "father! YES! FORGIVENESS!" I think the "floors" are God, and that nothings a secret, and to come as you are "barefoot". I think the nurses, children...ect, are the church goers clomping in their footwear, making a scene, praying.

but who's really right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:
Originally posted by spangler:

To me. I think this song is about church/confession. (note- i'm atheist so why i think this...idk). The 'Father' part, is like praying fervently. kind of like those fancy churches where people rock to and fro and shout things like "father! YES! FORGIVENESS!" I think the "floors" are God, and that nothings a secret, and to come as you are "barefoot". I think the nurses, children...ect, are the church goers clomping in their footwear, making a scene, praying.

but who's really right?

All these different interpretations make sense in different ways... Confession make sense ("Father" and "forgiveness" make for a fairly simple connection). However, your interpretation then goes into the image of a rowdy lively church setting. While Confession in the sacramental setting is a strictly Catholic notion, that kind of church setting is not. So if confession is the key scene, then I think the song would make a little more sense as a day-in-the-life of an intimate (yet emotionally intense) scene in a confessional.

Still, in that little twist on your interpretation, the line "the floors favorite feet are bare" seems out of place, as no one would show up with bare feet in a Catholic Church... I suppose the line could be construed as a metaphor for openness like "The floor prefers bare feet, just like God doesn't want you to cover any part of who you are." The same floor that has already 'heard everything' wouldn't want you to cover up those feet (feet representing sins because they're so unattractive?) before the eyes of God.

Okay so now that sets up a lot of symbolism in what each character is wearing on their feet. Anyone want to run with that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too thought this song was about abuse. The Father and the daughter. I think it fits with the setting of the song and the melody.

In that case I believe that the father disguises his intentions by playing games. (civilians, nurses, soldiers) "But hey girls, you should take your shoes off. the floor likes bare feet. and then the pants. yeah it's better if you take em off" kind of style.

The "yes" after fatherfather confused me though. It would make more sense if it was "no". But then I thought that maybe the daughter doesn't understand. She's just obedient 'cause you're supposed to obey your father. Many girls in this situation may not understand to say no. Especially if they're really young. They feel guilt that their fathers are not happy. If he's not happy it's her fault and therefore she does what he wants.

And then the church interpretation is really interesting! The bare feet is also a way to show respect. When Moses saw that bush that was on fire God told him to take his shoes off 'cause he was standing on holy ground. so it actually makes sense.

You shouldn't have to wear heels or boots. You should just be able to come as you are.

Actually, when I was at church 2 weeks ago the woman on stage singing came with no makeup and in her comfy clothes. And she always wear makeup and is looking perfect. First time with no makeup for 13 years I think. But she said she just felt that there shouldn't be a need to dress up when going to church. And that you should come as you are.

I think we might be a bit into these religious interpretations since Laughing With :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

haha! yes, i'm sure that Laughing With has had a real effect on our interpretations of regina's songs, altought that's reasonable, and not a bad thing. Who says Laughing With is the only song ever written with god/religion in mind? i remember dstinctly that several songs prior to LW were taken to have religious meaning, and several people had a problem with that, saying that regina "nver writes about that crap"... but now we see that it has, at least at one time, been a topic of songwriting interrest.

i hope it's not about abuse! but that has no bearing on whether it actually is... i might have to let that fester before concluding whether i think that's the meaning of the song.

abt the shoes: i forgot about moses and all the other times shoes were removed to acknowledge holiness. that fits beautifully. Yet i still can't shake the sexual vibe i get from this song. i'm leaning more and more toward a double entendre.. reg certainly doesn't shy away from either topic... but what would be the significance of abuse and religion being presented so closely? Perhaps the infamous Catholic priests who abused young boys? I can't really take that anywhere at the moment.

this song is cryptic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:
Originally posted by Be like the water, people.:

haha! yes, i'm sure that Laughing With has had a real effect on our interpretations of regina's songs, altought that's reasonable, and not a bad thing. Who says Laughing With is the only song ever written with god/religion in mind? i remember dstinctly that several songs prior to LW were taken to have religious meaning, and several people had a problem with that, saying that regina "nver writes about that crap"... but now we see that it has, at least at one time, been a topic of songwriting interrest.

yeah I always thought Aquarius was somehow about God "listening in the shadows". So I don't mean that it's just because of LW that we think as we do Wink

One of the things I really love about regina is the fact that she doesn't shy away from any topic =) She'll just say what's on her mind. Not many people would have the courage.

Catholic priests and young boys is possible... Wow. Hehe. We are so over-thinking this :P but it's intersting!

I'll go do some more thinking about this song...

edit: the whole respect/holiness/shoes off thing could also be applied on the abuse interpretation. Since the dad is "almighty" in that situation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this